We all have a major choice!!

As many of you are aware choosing a major is probably the hardest part of the college experience. Most of us do not come into college knowing what we want to do with our lives and that is perfectly okay. So what do I do? Many of you are probably asking yourselves this very question.

Let me give you all some advise on choosing a major. First off do not stress out about choosing a major because you have plenty of time to do so. Also don’t worry about your friends and everyone around you who already have picked their majors because in the end they will probably change their minds on what major they want as well.

The best advise I can tell you is take classes that you find interesting and things you think would be fun for you to take, because you want a major that you find fun and you could see yourself doing something with it for the rest of your life…. okay so maybe not your entire life! But if you ever need help with choosing a major or some ideas feel free to come to the first year experience office and ask some of us (First Year Mentors) because we are students that have all been through the choosing a major problem and would love to help you find one that you will love as much as we love ours!!

 

Here are some tips from the professionals at the Princeton Review on choosing a major!!

 

Forget high school. College is a whole new ball game. Subjects you hated as a high school student might turn out to be completely different in a new educational setting. In other words, don’t automatically rule anything out, even if you don’t think it’s for you. Give everything at least a small chance. You never know.

Make the most of the general education courses you’re required to take. Don’t just pick whatever’s easiest; choose ones that appeal to you, even if they are upper–level courses. You don’t yet know what will really compel you. Have your radar on for clues that might be pointing you in new directions.

Talk to your advisors. They know what it takes to tackle certain academic disciplines. Tell them your strengths and your interests. They’ll be able to highlight courses that might excite you as well as classes that are popular with other students. A great class on nihilism may be the thing that gets you to declare a philosophy major.

Check the syllabus. What are the assignments? The books? The requirements? Does the material seem compelling to you? If you start nodding off while reading the course catalogue, perhaps it’s best to cross that field off your list.

Ask upperclassmen. They are the real experts at your college, and they have faced the daunting task of declaring a major themselves. Older students can tell you the questions they considered and how they went about finding the answers.

Engage professionals in fields you find interesting. Ask them exactly what their jobs entail and how their careers do (or don’t) relate to their majors. Learning about the paths others took to get where they are is often valuable and enlightening, and even more often, surprising.

The bottom line is that your major does not determine your life. You should choose a subject that interests you and that has some connection to the post–collegiate life you want to build for yourself. But keep the decision in perspective; you can always change careers or go back to school.

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